Nurse Eye Roll

Critical care nurse. Nursing blog author. Helping you become a better nurse, one professional shenanigan at a time.
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A bit of a random question, but do NICU kiddos fall under the same rule regarding the ET tube to trach as adults? I'm a newbie working in an ICU and for our guys and gals its about 2 weeks with a ET tube and then you're trached (unless a trach was otherwise indicated). I'm just trying to imagine this going down considering some of the babies you work with are so teeny tiny and babies in general barely have necks. Just curious!
nurseeyeroll nurseeyeroll Said:

whatshouldwecallnicunursing:

Hey there, 

You’ll find that our neonates rarely fall under guidelines for other places. ;) 

Our kiddos will get trachs if they have a structural issue or chronic lung disease. There are different gestational age and weight requirements for each. I’m sorry that I don’t have more detailed info on it. 

Generally speaking though, it’s not unheard of for our patients to spend months traditional intubated on a ventilator. Although some docs are looking into “prophylactically” traching our kiddos to avoid the barotrauma associated with long term intubation. 

scienceshenanigans:

Okay while this is true, we need to keep things in perspective.
The mortality rate of influenza in 2010 was 807.3 deaths per 100,000 people infected. That’s a 0.81% mortality rate. 
Contrast that with ebola, which now has a mortality rate of 70% in parts West Africa. That means that statistically speaking, 7 out of 10 people infected in those areas will die. Fortunately, Nigeria has been able to contain its outbreak and is now declared ebola-free.
Yes, lots of people die from the flu. But many, many more who are infected with ebola die from it. Ebola is more a more lethal disease; that’s just the facts. Fortunately for us, it’s harder to transmit. You can only contract the ebola virus through direct contact with infected bodily fluids. Current knowledge suggests the virus is not easily aerosolized, unlike influenza virus. 
So let’s keep a little perspective, shall we? 

scienceshenanigans:

Okay while this is true, we need to keep things in perspective.

The mortality rate of influenza in 2010 was 807.3 deaths per 100,000 people infected. That’s a 0.81% mortality rate. 

Contrast that with ebola, which now has a mortality rate of 70% in parts West Africa. That means that statistically speaking, 7 out of 10 people infected in those areas will die. Fortunately, Nigeria has been able to contain its outbreak and is now declared ebola-free.

Yes, lots of people die from the flu. But many, many more who are infected with ebola die from it. Ebola is more a more lethal disease; that’s just the facts. Fortunately for us, it’s harder to transmit. You can only contract the ebola virus through direct contact with infected bodily fluids. Current knowledge suggests the virus is not easily aerosolized, unlike influenza virus. 

So let’s keep a little perspective, shall we? 

(via dopestethoscope)

realnursing:

Nurses through the years.

(via dancingnurse-ed)

tylercaulfield2012:

Very quick thinking. That was great.

(via fire-rescue-ems)

sixpenceee:

JOINTS IN MOTION

As said by IFL science

Cameron Drake of San Francisco has created a collection of magnificent images showing joints in motion. He was aided by orthopedic physician Dr. Noah Weiss and the finished product is completely amazing. If you’d like to know more about the project, please check out Drake’s blog.

(via fire-rescue-ems)

Shout out to Nina, Amber and all of the nurses that have taken care of our fellow comrades on the front lines. We are prayerful for a quick and complete recovery. This nation of nurses proudly stands with with you.

The AACN mission reminds us that patients and their families rely on nurses at the most vulnerable times of their lives. Sometimes in providing that care, nurses themselves place their lives in jeopardy. This week, we proudly witnessed members of our profession perform honorably and courageously while caring for patients under extraordinary circumstances. This is the time for healthcare professionals — and acute and critical care nurses in particular — to rally in support of Nina Pham, Amber Vinson and nurses everywhere who answer the call to care for the most vulnerable. It’s time to let them know how proud we are of them and the profession we love.
American Association of Critical Care Nurses (via dancingnurse-ed)

It’s Domestic Violence Awareness Month, y’all!